Uncomfortably Dark: My Interview with Candace Nola

Fellow readers, writers, and Friends of the Macabre,

Consider the following an informal newsletter as to what I’ve been up to, writing/publishing-wise.

The very first review for my new book, MATTERS MOST MACABRE, is now in and it’s overwhelmingly positive. Talented writer/reviewer, Candace Nola, has awarded it a full five stars, as well as interviewed me for her excellent website, Uncomfortably Dark. We talk about writing, creative influences, horror fiction, and more.

Feel free to check out that interview/review here: https://www.uncomfortablydark.com/blank-page-5

Thank you, Candace!

For my fellow readers, if you’d like to purchase my latest book in kindle, or paperback, or hardcover, I would be immensely grateful! Matters Most Macabre can be purchased here: https://www.amazon.com/Matters-Most-Macabre-Tylor-James-ebook/dp/B08Z7LM8TZ

Best,

Tylor James.

MATTERS MOST MACABRE (now available in paperback/kindle)

Fellow Friends of the Macabre,

I’d like to inform you that as of today (4/23/21) my best and latest book, MATTERS MOST MACABRE, is available in paperback and kindle, with a hardcover option on the way shortly.

I wrote this book “on the clock” during 2020, back when I worked as a security guard at a shut down cheese factory out in the middle of Nowhere, Wisconsin. The thirteen strange and bizarre tales featured in Matters Most Macabre will amuse, disturb, provoke thought, and just plain weird you out!

If this sounds like something you’d be interested in reading, please consider buying a copy. Buying books makes authors happy (especially this one). Here’s the Amazon link for Matters Most Macabre: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0939ZG3HV/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=Matters+Most+Macabre&qid=1619170179&s=books&sr=1-1

Thank you, fellow friends, readers, writers, and Aficionados of the Strange, for your continued support. I’m hoping that you enjoy the book . . . as far as I’m aware, there will be many more to come in the years ahead.

Best,

Tylor James.

Cover design by the ever talented writer and artist, Greg Chapman

“GODLY BUSINESS” by Tylor James (READ HERE, published in Penumbric Speculative Fiction).

Fellow Friends of the Macabre,

It’s with immense delight that I share this very strange, twisted tale with you. Godly Business is a story about a business man, Eddie Rednick, who discovers God’s gigantic corpse and decides to take advantage of this most (un)holy of business opportunities. If you enjoy the Grotesque, the Weird, and Unpredictable, consider reading this tale here: https://www.penumbric.com/currentissue/jamesBusiness.html

Penumbric Speculative Fiction Magazine is a free, online magazine with plenty of talents to behold. Feel free to dig into the other stories as well.

Thanks for reading this somewhat informal newsletter, fellow readers, writers, and friends.

And keep tuned for my upcoming book, due in just a few short weeks (April 22nd) —- my second short story collection, MATTERS MOST MACABRE. You may even pre-order it for kindle here: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08Z7LM8TZ

Best,

Tylor James

My Story, “If Fish Could Scream”, Published in THE PERIODICAL.

Dear readers and writers,

Quite happy to announce that my very strange, horrific short tale, If Fish Could Scream, is available in the latest issue of The Periodical, Forlorn.

The Periodical was looking for stories fitting a ‘lost at sea’ theme. Lo and behold, did I have a tale for them.

If Fish Could Scream borrows its title from a short essay by bioethicist, Peter Singer. The tale itself is, essentially, a fishing story about a man who turns into a fish and must learn to live the life of one. Kafkaesque, you might say, yet perhaps slightly more grotesque and macabre.

If this excites your intrigue, or if you’re perhaps interested in reading other stories with a ‘lost at sea’ theme, please consider purchasing the latest issue: https://www.periodicalforlorn.com/current-issue

What’s in store next for April? My story, GODLY BUSINESS, will be published in Penumbric Speculative Fiction Magazine (April 10th, to be exact). More on that later.

In the meantime, I’m wish you all a happy and bountiful spring.

Tylor James.

Lost at Sea.jpg

MATTERS MOST MACABRE (cover reveal/upcoming book by Tylor James)

Greetings boys and ghouls,

Just wanted to bring to your attention that I’ll have a new book out near the end of April! By my estimation, this is my very best work yet, and I’m hoping you’ll even consider nabbing a copy. What we have here are thirteen tales of the strange, the grotesque, and the macabre.

Here’s the wonderful cover design by Greg Chapman:

Here are the contents/stories:

  1. Introduction
  2. The Day the Stories Died
  3. Independence Day in Holebrim, Texas
  4. The Drip
  5. Godly Business
  6. Box of Chocolates
  7. The Typewriter
  8. When the Joke Grows Sharp Teeth
  9. The Shape
  10. Helga’s Helping Hands
  11. The Thing in Gregory Thornton’s Basement
  12. Order of the Wolf
  13. Avery’s Dog
  14. Everything is Broken
  15. Concluding Essay: The Stories Behind the Stories

I’m hoping fellow readers of dark/horror/weird fiction will enjoy this collection immensely. If you’re interested in reading some tales of mine, yet perhaps not invested enough to buy this book, I recommend reading WEIRDSMITH: Issue One, a very slim book containing just two stories of mine. It will give you a quality sampling of my work. Weirdsmith: Issue One is available on amazon for just .99 cents on Kindle, and $7.99 for paperback.

In other news, I’ve got tales popping up soon in April issues of The Periodical, Forlorn, Penumbric Speculative Fiction Magazine, and a future issue of Cosmic Horror Monthly.

Stay scary, friends,

Tylor James.

What Jasper Bark has to say about “WEIRDSMITH: ISSUE ONE”

Greetings friends and fellow readers,

It’s a lovely feeling when an author whom you highly respect compliments your work. Here’s what Jasper Bark, cult novelist and all-around literary Renaissance man, graciously had to say about WEIRDSMITH: Issue One:

In the space of these two stories, Tylor James puts the reader through an emotional wringer. Starting with a Roger Corman style, radioactive, body horror that is genuinely gruesome and highly chilling, Mosquito Summer left me wheezing on the floor holding my guts after the last line. Whereas the gentle lyricism of Old Dance Hall left me full of the sorrowful nostalgia that was once Rod Serling’s stock in trade. Be warned, if you pick this Weirdsmith up, you’re likely to find yourself hunting down everything else Tylor James has written.” — Jasper Bark, author of ‘Quiet Places’

Fellow dark fiction fans should know that WEIRDSMITH is a brand new series of novelette-length books from Too Much Weird press. Each issue features a talented author from the dark fiction/horror community. I’m fortunate enough to have two of my macabre tales selected for the first issue, available on kindle for 0.99 and in paperback for $7.99. Can’t beat those prices, eh?!?!

If interested, Weirdsmith: Issue One is available here: https://www.amazon.com/Weirdsmith-Magazine-Number-Tylor-James-ebook/dp/B08Q1WHZRQ/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=weirdsmith&qid=1611791211&s=books&sr=1-2

WEIRDSMITH: ISSUE ONE by Tylor James (HOT OFF THE ‘TOO MUCH WEIRD’ PRESS)

Hey, you!!!

Yeah, I mean you! Ahh, good — I’ve finally got your attention. Listen up, please:

I want to tell you about this little book just released by Too Much Weird press. The ink is dry, but the pages are warm. WEIRDSMITH: Issue One features two very strange and macabre tales of mine, Mosquito Summer — a disturbing creature-feature story to make you ITCH — and Old Dance Hall — a supernatural tale which will creep you out, and possibly make you weep simultaneously.

It’s available on kindle for just $1.99, or you can procure yourself a very affordable paperback. See here, if interested, and I sure hope you are: https://www.amazon.com/Weirdsmith-Magazine-Number-Tylor-James-ebook/dp/B08Q1WHZRQ/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=Tylor+James&qid=1609862516&s=books&sr=1-1

Now, if you read Weirdsmith: Issue One, finding that you enjoy shivering with terror and gooseflesh, please consider keeping an eye out (just not literally! ha ha) for Issue Two, which will spotlight yet another talented author.

If interested in reading my work, but aren’t invested in buying a full book of my stuff, Weirdsmith: Issue One will make for a fine sampling. THEN, you won’t help but have to lay down your hard-earned cash for a copy of my next, big book: MATTERS MOST MACABRE (available May 2021). That, at least, is my selfish hope.

Thanks for reading, and if you enjoy the tales in WEIRDSMITH: Issue One, feel free to leave a review. I’d appreciate that.

Stay weird, friends.

Tylor James.

PS: Terry M. West is the editor of TMW Press, as well as designer of the rad cover for Weirdsmith Issue One, and is one fantastic writer of horror. Give the fella a looksie, you won’t regret it! http://terrymwest.com/

2020: Reading, Writing, Publishing & Covid-19 — A Tally of Achievements & Failures.

Well, folks. It’s that time of year again! Grab yourself a cup of coffee, OK? Perhaps some tea, a glass of Merlot, or a can of beer — whatever is your preferred comfort, and let’s have us a visit. 
Late December is a fine time for self-reflection, and to tally what has gone on these previous twelve months. A tally of achievements, as well as failures — we can learn from both.


By my side, a cup of steaming black coffee. In the background, John Coltrane wails on his saxophone, heading somewhere for Heaven on that Immortal Blue Train. Outside, snow flurries in the wind and I am reminded we are all snowflakes, each and every one of us, blown by the wild, random gusts of the universe and one day to fall, one day to melt, then become new again.


That’s the Order Of Things, and I’m perfectly cool with it. 


QUICK NOTE ON CURRENT EVENTS OF 2020


2020, in particular, has been a challenging year for the individual, the nation, the world. Every person who lived through this year (and lived to tell the tale) knows exactly what I’m talking about. I will only say that I have experienced first-hand — the panicky ransacking of grocery store shelves during the first months of the pandemic, a peaceful Black Lives Matter protest, legendary incompetence in leadership within the U.S. government, and I’ve even managed to contract Covid-19, a virus which has killed nearly 300,000 Americans, and well over a million people worldwide. 


Highly unpleasant lower-back aches, chills accompanied by goosebumps covering every inch of one’s flesh, typical congestion, and absolute weariness are among the charming symptoms I experienced. Thankfully, I pulled through just fine, as did my fiancé and daughter. As for those who are immuno-compromised, for those who are not as well equipped to handle this virus, they have my sincere empathy. Take care of yourselves out there, friends. Be kind, and be courteous.

WRITING


With those unpleasantries out of the way, let us get to my favorite part of this whole thing —- the joy of writing, reading, and publishing. 


I wrote a lot this year, and this is about what it adds up to:


Forty-nine stories (including three 20,000 word novellas).

Fifty poems. 

Half a dozen essays (not sure if they’re any good at all).

LOTS of vignettes (or, my term for them — musings).

Two journal books featuring personal reflections, 4AM rantings, and a writing progress log. 

In total, an approximate word count of well over 300,000 words.

Now, for some writers that’s not so much. But for me, that’s quite a damn lot. I’m rather proud of the work I’ve done this year. I’ve grown significantly as a writer, and continue to grow every day, word by word and page by page.


Yet remember what I said about tallies at the beginning of this essay? We must tally our achievements as much as our failures. Not so that we may shame ourselves — oh, no. Only so that we may be honest with ourselves and see things clearly.

For example, the majority of the stories I wrote this year are downright awful. They are stories which, for one reason or other, just do not work. They are incomplete worlds, shallow characterizations, badly phrased, naively stylized pieces of junk-prose which will never see the light of day. 


However! My personal view is, our failed stories pave the way for the really good ones. Therefore, thousands of wasted words, are not necessarily wasted. Just so long as we are learning — grueling page after grueling page. 

Now, some exciting news: I have written a book this year!


MATTERS MOST MACABRE is my latest collection of short stories. It’ll be released in June of 2021. How’s that for exciting?! I’m quite proud of these tales, and I am absolutely thrilled to share them with you. The thirteen macabre tales herein will hopefully entertain you, have you turning the pages with that pleasurable and intense need to FIND OUT WHAT HAPPENS, and of course, the book may just weird you the hell out. That is my goal. That is my pleasure. 


Now, before Matters Most Macabre comes out, I have a charming little book of just seventy-six pages available on New Year’s Day —- WEIRDSMITH: ISSUE ONE, courtesy of Too Much Weird press, contains two of my short stories. My talented friend, Terry M. West, aside from being a hell of a great horror writer, is the Editor-in-Chief over at TMW Press, and he’s set up a brand new series for readers who enjoy everything weird and horrific in literature. Weirdsmith will be a multi-volume series, each issue featuring one talented author doing great work in horror fiction. If interested, Issue One is available for pre-order now at only $.99, or you can even pick up a lovely paperback: (https://www.amazon.com/Weirdsmith-Magazine-Number-Tylor-James-ebook/dp/B08Q1WHZRQ/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1609162936&sr=1-1)


PUBLISHING

Let’s talk publishing. Hold on a sec, lemme check my tally . . . all right, here we are! Ahh, yes. Allow me to start with one of my total failures.


My story, Box of Chocolates, was all set up to be published. The story was to be published on the press-in-question’s website. I would received my measly $10 and that would be that. Then, after my story was accepted, I decided investigate some of the Editor-in-Chief’s work. I had a passing curiosity about the guy and, well, why not? 


My simple Google search revealed racist and homophobic statements on behalf of the editor. Therefore, it became my moral obligation to retract the story.

So, that’s what I did. I politely apologized, explained my reasons for retracting the story, and that was that. 

Now, here’s the good news:


“Box of Chocolates”, a strange tale about a man’s fiancé and mother-in-law turning into chocolate statues, was published just a few months later in issue #27 of THE LITERARY HATCHET.


I got my ten bucks, folks! And the story was published by a decent and reputable publisher. I’ve learned my lesson — always perform a cursory background Google-check on the people you plan on working and associating with. It’s a sad task, but one which we must commit ourselves to just the same — for the sake of our personal reputation, and for the moral quality of our friendships, business partners, ETC.


Okay. Here’s some successful publications from this year:


1. Box of Chocolates — published in The Literary Hatchet.

2. Independence Day in Holebrim, Texas — published in SCARE ME, a wonderfully creepy anthology from UK-based, Esskaye Books.

3. Behind the Door (Originally titled, “The Drip”) — published in HYPNOS MAGAZINE.

4. Old Dance Hall and Mosquito Summer — sold and soon-to-be-published in “WEIRDSMITH: ISSUE ONE” from Too Much Weird press.

5. Godly Business — sold and soon-to-be-published (in Jan 2021) by Penumbric Speculative Fiction Magazine. 

6. A Skeleton Reads Shakespeare — published as a podcast by THE OTHER STORIES PODCAST (which you may listen to here, if you’d like: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fja9JZklAZI

All tallied up, that’s seven tales published (or soon-to-be). Hey, that ain’t bad, Charlie!

Okay, enough gloating! — back to my failures tally.


In This Year of Our Lord, 2020, I have received . . . drumroll please? thank you . . . !

Over ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY SHORT STORY REJECTIONS.


Rejections aren’t fun. They never are. But they are part of the process of being a writer. In 2021, I hope to secure a hundred and fifty more . . . And maybe a few more story acceptances too, while I’m at it.


Another failure: I tried to write a novel. Tried is the operative word.
The novel was to be titled, Come Back, Grandma Jean. I got a third of the way through, and then I burned out. I found no inspiration in the characters, hadn’t a clue where the plot was going, and had written in way too many sex scenes. The book was turning into sheer smut — which is fine and dandy, just not the book I wanted to write. Hence: 20,000 words chucked down the garbage chute! Ahh, well. Maybe 2021 will see the creation of my first full-length novel. Maybe!


READING


As anyone who’s even relatively acquainted with me knows, I love to read. It is among my very favorite things to do. I read fiction and non-fiction books alike, always doing my best to balance the two. As you can see by my reading list from this year, I ended up reading a bit more fiction than non-fiction.


The Books I Read in 2020:


1. In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto by Michael Pollan

2. How to Change Your Mind: What the New Science of Psychedelics Teaches Us About Consciousness, Dying, Addiction, Depression and Transcendence by Michael Pollan

3. The Institute by Stephen King

4. Abarat by Clive Barker

5. Long After Midnight by Ray Bradbury

6. Sunburst Woman & Poems by Jack Ontair

7. Braincheese Buffet by Edward Lee

8. Hamlet by William Shakespeare

9. On the Night Border by James Chambers

10. Borderland (story anthology, edited by Tom Montelleone).

11. Cry Down Dark by T.J. Tranchell

12. Strange Wine by Harlan Ellison 

13. Where Nightmares Come From: The Art of Storytelling in the Horror Genre

14. Asleep in the Nightmare Room by T.J. Tranchell

15. The Resurrectionist by James Wrath White

16. I Sing the Body Electric! By Ray Bradbury

17. Of Foster Homes and Flies by Chad Lutzke

18. Transfer by Terry M. West

19. The Devil’s List by Terry M. West

20. The Midwives by Duncan Ralston

21. When You Find Out What You’re Made of by Michelle Kilmer

22. Stuck on You & Other Prime Cuts by Jasper Bark

23. Ceremony of Ashes by Robert Ducharme

24. The Cellar by Richard Laymon

25. God Bless You, Doctor Kevorkian by Kurt Vonnegut

26. Space Chronicles: Facing the Ultimate Frontier by Neil deGrasse Tyson

27. The Collection by Bentley Little

28. Beyond Where the Sky Ends by DS Ullery

29. Full Throttle: Stories by Joe Hill

30. The History of Philosophy by A.C. Grayling

31. If It Bleeds by Stephen King

32. An Edge in My Voice (columns) by Harlan Ellison

33. Alessa’s Melody (A Novella) by R. Ducharme

34. Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson

35. Ethics in the Real World by Peter Singer

36. Voltaire’s Revolution: Writings From His Campaign to Free Laws From Religion by GK Noyer

37. The Private Lives of Nightmares by T.J. Tranchell

38. Highway 181 by DS Ullery

39. Scare Me (anthology, edited by M. Leon Smith)

40. Quiet Places by Jasper Bark

41. The Road by Cormac McCarthy

42. The Believing Brain: From Ghosts to Gods to Politcs and Conspiracies — How We Construct Beliefs & Reinforce Them As Truths by Michael Shermer

43. The Grand Design by Stephen Hawking & L. Mlodinow

44. Island of the Flesh Eaters by Thomas S. Flowers

45. Radigan by Louis L’Amour

46. Needful Things by Stephen King

47. The Writing Life: Reflections, Recollections & A Lot of Cursing by Jeff Strand

48. Ashes and Wine, Book One: The Extraoridinary Lives of Intimacy & Love by Jack Ontair

49. Write Great Fiction: Plot & Structure by James Scott Bell

50. Dandelion Wine by Ray Bradbury

51. The Yellow Wallpaper & Other Stories by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

It was a great year for reading, and I thoroughly enjoyed the majority of these books. I learned quite a lot, both from the educational science books, as well as from the storytelling techniques employed by the likes of fiction-writers like Bradbury, King, McCarthy, and my contemporaries in the independent horror market.

However, my favorite book that I’ve read this year is undoubtedly, THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY by A.C. Grayling (British philosopher and Master of New College of the Humanities, London). This book was eloquent, accessible, and fascinating. It’s also over 700 pages. Quite the tome, but really well-worth the time and effort. I read it on summer evenings, cup of coffee by my side and Bach’s Goldberg Variations trickling into my ears.


As for books/authors I’d like to read in 2021 . . . Here’s just a few:

Letters to A Young Contrarian by Christopher Hitchens.

Anything by Ursula K. Le Guin

Anything by Sylvia Plath

Enlightenment philosophers, such as: David Hume, John Lock, Diderot, Rousseau.

Asimov on the Bible, and “Extraterrestrial Civilization”.

Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari.

Anything by my Contemporaries-In-Horror: Duane Ullery, Terry M. West, Jasper Bark, Duncan Ralston, Michelle von Eeshen, T.J. Tranchell, ETC.


I’ll have to leave it at that . . . because there’s a million more books I’d love to read!


DAMN GOOD FILMS


I don’t watch a lot of films these days. Hence, this list will be short. However, I assure you, these films are among the very best. Some are new, some are black and white classics. Without further ado, the films I most enjoyed this year:


1. The Seventh Seal (1957, Dir. By Ingmar Bergman)

2. The Lighthouse (2019, Dir. Robert Eggers, starring incredible performances by William Dafoe & Robert Pattinson)

3. Night of the Hunter (1955, Dir. by Charles Laughton)

4. Jason & the Argonauts (1963, Dir. Don Chaffey, w/ effects by Ray Harryhausen)

5. Modern Times (1936, Charlie Chaplin)

6. The Thing From Another World (1951, Dir. Howard Hawks)

7. Paris, Texas (1984, Dir. Wim Wenders, starring Harry Dean Stanton)

8. Hereditary (2018, Dir. Ari Aster)

9. Midsommar (2019, Dir. Ari Aster)

10. Tideland (2005, Dir Terry Gilliam)


A FEW LAST WORDS


In conclusion: While I’m proud of my writing/publishing achievements, in a somewhat perverse sense, I’m even more proud of my failures. Those 150 story rejections, for example, are evidence for how much I care about this craft, and this business.


I’m also happy to have made many new writer friends. We may’ve only met each other via online interactions, but it’s been a pleasure getting to know you, chatting with you IM, working with you, and reading your works. You know who you are.

On a significant note, I would not be able to write if I didn’t have a night job which allowed me to do it on the clock. As a writer, I find myself in a nearly ideal situation. I sit up in the lonely clock tower, making sure nobody comes round to steal anything, and I chew my nails, drink gallons of black coffee, listen to scary sounds in the night, and I write books. I also have the utmost support from my lovely and wonderful fiancé, in all matters of endeavor. For her, I am absolutely grateful.

And now, for another cup of coffee, some music, a few more books, and whole lot more stories . . . 


Wishing you a most happy and fulfilling New Year, fellow readers, writers, and friends,

Tylor James. 

What Is A Book-Dragon, And Should It Replace the Bookworm?

Fellow readers and writers,

We have all heard of a ‘bookworm’. It’s a term for people who are enthusiastic about reading books. I remember, as a child, wandering about the elementary school book fair and noticing a poster of a plump green worm with round spectacles, a book clamped firmly within its tiny hands.

This character is good-natured and amiable enough, but one hardly likes being referred to as a worm. A ‘bookworm’ is often used as a gentle pejorative, rather than a term of endearment. That said, I wouldn’t mind one bit if someone should smile slyly and call me out for being a bookworm. Most likely I’d accept the locution with beaming pride. Yet if I truly had my druthers, I prefer by far a term I’ve heard increasingly from fellow readers. That being, a book-dragon.


A book dragon, in my estimation, is a far worthier and accurate term for avaricious readers. Can you picture it?


A wise old mythological beast of great literary merit, snuggled within its hollowed cave, lording over ancient treasures — stacks upon stacks of glorious books. Perhaps this dragon, like the poster of the worm, wears glasses. Except . . . do you notice how much more dignified the dragon appears wearing them compared to the worm? Perhaps the dragon even blows wisps of smoke from its nostrils when reading something particularly curious or satisfying. Perhaps its scales glow and throb with ember reds, or alien greens; an outward sign of its excited mind.


What can the poor bookworm do except wriggle and writhe in the dirt? Good for cultivation of soil, perhaps, yet he hardly provides for the cultivation of mind. 


Yet the dragon, cozy in its fortress of knowledge, wiles away the hours in joy and contemplation. Utterly dignified, poised and urbane, the book-dragon exudes erudition and benevolent power.


The aforementioned attributes, after all, are often achieved over a life time of excellent reading. For knowledge is power, and books possess knowledge. If a reader should memorize and practice said knowledge, they will become empowered. So long as they remain forever humble and curious, their knowledge may even transform into wisdom.


Reading books is to be highly encouraged. Our friendly ol’ pal, the bookworm, has done his best in encouraging an entire generation to read. For that, the gentle fellow deserves our gratitude.

However, times change and our mascots of intelligence and literacy will come and go. Perhaps it is high time we welcome in the posters, t-shirts, and advertisement material of the book-dragon; being the kindly, wise, intelligent, and powerful representative it may prove to be to the upcoming generation of dedicated readers.


I do not think the bookworm shall resent his displacement. For as poet William Blake wrote, “The cut worm forgives the plow.”

Of course, there’s much to be said about long-lasting, meaningful friendships. Perhaps the bookworm and the book-dragon could read and share their joyous literary discoveries together?

A world of bookworms and book-dragons seems like a delightful one indeed.

Regards,

Tylor James.